Marine Biologist

Marine Biologist

Marine biologists study aquatic organisms and their habitats. They design controlled laboratory and natural field experiments to meet their objectives. Additionally, they serve as experts regarding marine conservation and aquaculture practices.
What Responsibilities Will I Have?: 
  • Design controlled laboratory and natural field experiments
  • Observe marine wildlife and organisms in their natural habitats
  • Inventory specific populations over periods of time
  • Collect water, mineral and plant samples to test
  • Measure water conditions to determine the value of life
  • Dissect and preserve marine life
  • Study aquatic life diseases and create plans to control outbreaks
  • Monitor environmental pollution
  • Utilize various laboratory equipment, tools and computer programs
  • Oversee activity and duties of assisting marine technicians
  • Follow up with employer and invested third parties with research findings
  • Write and publish journals or reports on research findings
  • Oversee the care and maintenance of aquatic animals
  • Serve as an expert regarding marine conservation 
Recommended High School Courses: 
The following high school courses are recommended: agricultural education, biology, earth science and mathematics.
Education/Training Required: 
A minimum of a bachelor’s degree in marine biology or a closely related field is required to become a marine biologist. A master’s degree is often preferred, however.
Future Job Market Outlook: 
Typical Employers: 
Aquaculture production farms, government agencies, universities, zoos, aquariums and research firms employ marine biologists.
Suggested Professional Organizations and Associations: 
  • MarineBio Conservation Society
  • Society for Conservation Biology
  • American Institute of Biological Sciences
  • National Association of Marine Laboratories
Average Annual Full-Time Salary: 
$72,000
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Salary data is provided by the AgCareers.com Compensation Benchmark Review™. These salaries should be considered as examples and are provided for educational and exploratory purposes. The salary information provided should not be used as a benchmark. Actual salaries are influenced by numerous variables including but not limited to demographics, size and scope of the role, level of experience, qualifications, and education of the worker.